Why Hire A Consultant?

At some point the question will come up. “Why would we pay someone to help us raise money?” In one way it seems counter-intuitive. Pay money to make money? Whether it comes from a conservative church leadership or a fear of justifying the action to the members, most churches will face this basic question. (Non-profits do not have this hesitancy.) So why hire a consultant?

Hiring a consultant brings success

Statistics over the past 40 years have consistently shown that churches can raise one times their annual giving without hiring someone. To raise more than this, a consultant is almost always required.*

Fundraising is a skill

A church hires a consultant for the same reason they hire preachers, youth workers and counselors. A seminary trained minister with 25 years’ experience may be marvelous in the pulpit but clueless when it comes to the mechanics of a campaign.

A campaign is a spiritual experience

Often when churches do a campaign with no outside help, it comes off as a fundraiser. Every church we have worked with will testify that it was a spiritual experience.

Mistakes can be made

An experienced consultant knows what to do and when. A common mistake of church led campaigns is setting the bar too low for individuals and the church. An outside consultant can help unearth large gifts that may go undetected.

Hard work

There is something about hiring someone that raises the expectations for everyone. Just the idea of hiring a consultant communicates, “This campaign is no ordinary church program.”

 

*Some extraordinary churches can raise more than one times their annual giving. These churches either have a person on staff who is particularly gifted or members who have already indicated significant support. Likewise, not every church can raise one times their annual giving either. A common mistake is thinking a couple of sermons, a letter and a pledge card will do the trick. These churches wind up disappointed. In other words, raising funds over and above your annual giving is harder than you think.